Friday, 25 May 2012

The Prediction - It's getting hot in here!

Wow, the temperature has been rising and I'm not talking about the weather! Some sizzling entries for last week's Prediction even with that curve ball of a word Cockle. Hoping that the book is a bit kinder this week. Yet that didn't disturb our intrepid Predictioneers and you left me with a headache, a very welcome headache, in my debut week as judge, jury and executioner due to the quality of writing throughout.

Anyway, you don't want to hear me prattle on, you want to know who the inaugural winner of Phlambler's Prediction is. So, after much deliberation, let me put you out of your misery.

My winner is Veronica Marie Lewis-Shaw with her entry which was literally To Die For. Veronica - I loved the description in this piece and felt like I was living through the characters as I read it. Superb and well deserved.

I have two runners-up this week with two different yet compelling pieces. The first is Shaun Adams with A Tale From Bile County Part 2 . Shaun - my heart was caught in my throat as I read this piece. The stolen child and the dying wife were such strong totems and the promised revenge gave a chilling finish.

My second runner up is William Davoll with The Mighty Have Fallen. The last entry of the week was packed with a superb concept mixing science fiction and the occult. William - I felt that this one could build into something much bigger and the character of Tower Block Lily was genius.

So my congratulations to my winner and runners-up for the week and to everyone else who entered; I lost count of the number of times I changed my final decision!

So, onto this week's Prediction. Already this tome is feeling so comfortable in my hands and it almost seems as if it is whispering to me; maybe one day I won't even need to open the pages to get the words. And here they are springing forth:
  • Barge
  • Saint
  • Quiz
The usual rules apply: 100 words maximum, excluding the title, of flash fiction or poetry using all of the three words above in the genres of horror, fantasy or science fiction. All variants and use of the words as stems are fine.

You have until 9pm (UK time) Thursday 31 May to get your entries in. The winner will be announced at 9am Friday 1 June ready for the bank holiday weekend when new words will then spill forth. If you can, please tweet about your entry using the #fridayflash #100words or #flashfiction hashtags and blog if you feel like it. Please tell your friends and do give feedback to your fellow Predictioneers - everyone appreciates it!

I can't wait to see what tales you are going to punt my way this week.....

128 comments:

  1. Hi Phil, the calibre of entrants continues to be superb. Congratulations to Veronica Marie Lewis-Shaw, the characters are well drawn in this piece. Also Congrats to Shaun Adams a Brilliant story that's sure to continue into something Bigger. As for me, I'm chuffed to bits to be a runner up in such fine company. Tower Block Lily is sure to be developed.

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  2. Congrats to Veronica, Shaun and William. Apologies for not getting round to commenting. I read most and will get round to reading all...eventually.

    A great turnout for your first week, Phil.

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  3. Thank you Phil,Congratulations to Veronica and William, and to everyone who took part. I'm very pleased with that.

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  4. Wow! I am (been waiting to say this) totally chuffed! Thank you so much! I may be a bit prejudiced, but I did rather like To Die For... working with all of the amazing talent here has definitely 'upped' my game... and for that, I thank each and every one of you!

    Congratulations to Shaun and William for some very excellent writing! Yes... I am looking forward to more of Tower Block Lily, William. Shaun - Part 2 left a lump in my throat and a chill throughout me.

    I will try to get back and comment on the rest of the stories from last week... I've been going 90 miles an hour all week - did someone shorten the days?

    This week's words look very inviting... shall see what we can come up with. :)

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  6. Congratulations, Veronica, Shaun and William!! Great writing.
    I can see the standards are not going to drop, so ... more work needed to get there, says me.
    Great words this week, will go ponder.
    Phil, this is a very nice Lily substitute, comfortable and friendly and as tough competition as before ... congratulations to you for making it so!

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    1. Thanks Antonia - that's very kind of you to say so.

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  7. (Slight juggling needed all fixed now)

    A Tale From Bile County
    Part 3

    Uttoxeter’s mind drifted like a funereal barge. He turned at the sound of footsteps. Townsfolk, his old friend Saint among them. They shuffled their feet, uneasy in the presence of another’s grief.

    “It was interlopers, Uttoxeter, devil men. Two townies dead, Milo Thomas the butcher, they hacked him to pieces with his own cleaver, hung the parts in his shop window. The old quiz master, he dropped dead of a seizure when he saw what they did to poor Milo.”

    Saint faltered, unable to look his friend in the eye.

    “How many children?” Uttoxeter asked.

    “Three missing including your Elizabeth.”

    ~to be continued~

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    1. This is building nicely Shaun. You really captured the uneasiness of Saint as he bore the news and then you leave us desperate to know what has happened to those poor children.

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    2. Keep going Shaun - you've managed to include characters with a myriad of possibilities and a lot of tension.

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    3. I'm really enjoying the mounting tension of Bile Country's imbalance Shaun. I know hard it is to write a series and maintain continuity - you're doing a fine job so far!

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    4. Congratulations on writing a coherent narrative with these entries its good stuff - the butchers death is brilliantly grisily

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    5. The series approach is truly impressive. Nice work.

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    6. What a cliffhanger, Shaun. A great hook to hang a serial on, and a grisly episode in itself.

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    7. Oh a clifhanger ending! A great way to keep us reading!

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    8. The voice in this is really strong, which is difficult to do in a short piece. I'm heading back to last week's entries to start at the beginning!

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    9. And the mystery deepens... what of the children?

      Great voice in this story, Shaun!

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  8. the killing field

    “When the saints go marching in, what mischief finds the devil in the fields?”

    The words were but whispers, carried on a humid, warm breeze. It felt like hot breath on Peter’s neck. He dared not cry out. The reaper would hear, barging through the stalks with his sickle.

    He was near, taunting Peter. His query, his quiz, his test was nothing more than that—a cruel game.

    In silence, Peter turned toward the highway and began to run. To his left, moonlight caught on the edge of a curved blade. This time, he failed to suppress his scream.

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    1. Lovely and atmospheric this, Dex.

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    2. A beautiful pagan feel to this Hunter's Moon-lit piece Dex, with the sickle glistening in the silver light.

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    3. You can actually feel the devil bearing down on poor Peter it's like a cruel Field of Dreams

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    4. Has a classic horror movie feel, Dex, the reaper stalking through the wheat field, the suppressed scream... nice. =)

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    5. I agree with John this has a classic horror movie feel - very nice.

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    6. Dex, nice. "Moonlight caught on the edge of a curved blade."

      Oh how I love that line.

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    7. As one who lives in the middle of corn fields (ankle high now, but right before harvest, a dark and dry nightmare, this one really chilled me.

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    8. Thank you so much to everyone for the encouragement/feedback. It's nice to hear that something was well received...and nice to see the community of writers pulling for one another!

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    9. Wonderfully atmospheric, Dex... has a nice pagan feel to it.

      "...moonlight caught on the edge of a curved blade"... and my breath caught in my throat when I read that line... but, I didn't scream. Well, okay, I did make a sound, but I would call it a scream... a prelude to a scream perhaps. Haha!

      Brilliantly written, Dex!

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  9. Welcome Dex. This is good, this is very good. There's an oppressive atmosphere here which you evoke so well with that warm, humid breeze and the piece just oozes terror. I found myself holding my breath as Peter hid in silence amongst the crops. Excellent.

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    1. Thanks so much to everyone for being so welcoming and encouraging. I genuinely appreciate it!

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  10. Congratulations Veronica! A blissful tale well worthy of a win. And well done too to Shaun and William for two bitingly good stories/series.

    Apologies for not commenting on everyone's entries - work life overtook any spare time I had this week.

    Interesting new words, Phil - putting brain in gear...

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  11. Firstly thanks to everyone who commented on last week’s entry you are all very kind and congratulations to Veronica, Shaun and William.

    The ferryman

    The barge slowly made its way down the dead, black river. Charlon stood at the stern and gently punted towards the crowd assembled on the distant shore.

    Men, women, saints and sinners - all of humanity had travelled on his barge. How he hated and despised them, human cattle. The smell of their fear becomes sickening when they finally realise the truth of His lies.

    A few of them would quiz him on their fate but Charlon stands silent and implacable as ever.

    The furnaces would burn bright tonight and his brothers would eat well – as they did every night.

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    1. A grim taste of death, Nick. What's the point of leading a sinless life when you'll be consumed by the ferryman and his kin? Chilling stuff.

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    2. Nick, you curr, I was going to use Charon in my piece but then I read this and saw how you have done him much better justice. What I love about this piece is Charon's own bitter disappointment and suffering of his lot in life (death) of having to ferry the despised humanity. Top stuff.

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    3. I love it. Nice imagery. You did a really fine job of creating an overall feel.

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    4. I love a good twist in a myth, Nick. No afterlife, just the ferryman's cooking pot! =)

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    5. That's one boat to the afterlife you wouldn't want to be on!

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    6. Nick, a creepy twist in the tail of this tale.

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    7. Oh, that's a neat trick. Do you suppose it counts as just desserts?

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    8. Great imagery and mood here, Nick... loved the twist!

      I tried to write something along this theme, but the words which seem to have flowed so effortlessly from your pen, would not come out of mine. And after reading your little slice, I am glad of it... you more than did the words justice.

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  12. A Tale From Bile County
    Part 4

    Two townies dead.

    It irked Uttoxeter that even Saint still viewed Lily as an outsider. He shrugged off the urge to rail at their xenophobic traits. These people had good reason to fear outsiders.

    “Burn all this, Saint, when you’re done, throw the Quizmaster in the Butchers shop, burn that too. Do it now.”

    A hapless townie gasped as the biker barged through and out the bat-winged doors to the street

    “Ain’t natural that a man can move so fast.”

    Saint spun on his heel and stared the complainer down.

    “Shut the fuck up ‘n’ do as he says.”

    ~To be continued~

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    1. Ditto what I said for Part 3, Shaun. And suddenly this takes a faster pace, as does my heart. Yes!

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    2. Slowly teasing out more details. Intrigued about the unnaturalness of Uttoexeter's speed; is he something more than human?!?! Keep it coming.

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    3. OK, Shaun, did I say hook? I meant hooks. Quite a few threads seem to be emerging through this already. Keep up the good work. =)

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    4. Thanks all. You mentioned maintaining continuity in your comment for part 3 Lily. I wondered how the Honkytonk's door
      became "Bat-winged in this episode. Oops. I apologize and will try not to allow more discrepancies creep in. Going off to iron my hands now. ;)

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    5. The suspense builds... love the pacing on this, Shaun.

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  13. 'Irked' a very good word and the 'fear outsiders' opens up several potential terrible tales. This is going from strength to strength

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  14. Many congratulations to Veronica, Shaun and William, all very worthy winners of Phil’s first stint as host.

    The blacksmith’s wife [part 15]

    Returned, his brother’s quizzical amusement at seeing me in his good cambric shirt lessened at Gabriel’s comment on the contents of his saddlebags.
    “T’was not by saintly means a humble bargee came by such quantity of sovereigns!”
    “A third of it is yours, for shelter ... half for a turn at your delicious wife.”
    “She’s not for whoring ... and I’d not give you house room.”
    “Not bribery? Then needs must be brute force.”
    Seizing me, flat-siding a slender blade against my throat, he forced me to mount, climbed up behind, reins one-handed, spurring us away, leaving Gabriel near incandescent.

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    1. Rape and abduction, a terrifying combination that might well knock the flirtatious wife to her knees. Yet another twist Sandra - on with the chase!

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    2. Another fine entry in your ongoing tale how you manage to spin a continuing story out of the Prediction is very interesting and very difficult I'm sure

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    3. I'm going to have to go back and read parts 1-14. Excellent dialogue.

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    4. Thanks Dex - the simplest way to read all together is look at http://sandra-linesofcommunication.blogspot.co.uk/p/friday-predictions.html
      Nick - my opinion is that it's easier to keep one story ticking over than re-invent every week ...
      Thanks Lily - her on her knees could prove ... interesting?

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    5. And now our lady is stolen away! I sense a chase on ahead of us. Great dialogue in this, gives a really strong sense of the characters for those new to the serial.

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    6. Given Gabriel's penchant for creative revenge, I don't think there's anything pleasant in store for his brother...

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    7. Oh another tense episode - I think Gabriel's brother better keep watch over his shoulder from now on!

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    8. Excellent as always Sandra.Brother against brother this will be interesting.

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    9. Now, why would I be less afraid of what might happen to her than what she might to do him? ;)

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    10. Love the innuendo in that last sentence, Sandra... and the delicious twist here... you tell the tale so beautifully!

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  15. Thanks all for joining me in week two. Guess the hor d'oeuvres went down a treat last week then ;-)

    Great entries so far and plenty of room for more so do keep them coming.

    I found the words difficult this week and have changed the focus of my piece twice yet (see comment to Nick for one!) this came to me on the train home this evening.

    Let's see what you all think.

    First date

    The tension was palpable as they stared into each other's eyes.

    The date had been perfect. He was saintly throughout; buying her flowers, whispering sweet nothings in her ear; and paying for everything.

    Inevitably they had ended back at hers, one thing on their mind, raw and carnal.

    He hadn't known she'd overheard his call whilst she freshened up in the bathroom. Heard the phrases '..touch with a barge-pole..', '.anything for a bet..' 'bought my bullshit..'.

    And so they stared, him quizzically, as hot, sticky blood dripped over her hand from the knife she held stuck in his gut.

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    1. Well done for the 'barge-pole' Phil, having avoided it I'd've been cross if everyone else did too ... Raw and carnal indeed.

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    2. Yipes, I'm guessing that wasn't part of the bet... I like the return to the opening line too, Phil, a well-constructed little piece. =)

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    3. You never know who's listening - nothing like a woman's wrath

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    4. Ouch. What if he wasn't talking about her, then she'd feel silly. ;)
      Good work Phil

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    5. And yet, I sit here sympathizing with her. Nicely done!

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    6. Phil, I'm interested that his behaviour was saintly - I'm assuming that was how he considered it - rather than you as the storyteller? (Scared now). Great use of barge-pole and a splendid revenge. (Thank heavens for fiction.)

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    7. Yes, the hors d'oeuvres are quite tasty! Those little purple crunchy things remind me a bit of... oh, but wait... I don't want to spoil the surprise for the unsuspecting palate.... hehe!

      Saintly actions perhaps, but the thoughts behind those tender touches are revealed and she must take matters in her own hands... evil and darkness... mmmmm... this was most satisfying to the palate as well.

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  16. Congratulations to the winners of Phlamber's Phirst Prediction... ;)


    Rewrite

    Saint Araxis (XI) is dead, headless.

    He lies slumped across the tactical map desk in the war room of his battle barge. Little wooden ships, tanks and soldiers have been scattered to countries far removed from the current conflict, and to the floor.

    Sensors built into the oak desk have recorded this movement and issued corresponding orders. Quizzical transmissions are coming back from the front lines; the battlefield commanders are understandably concerned.

    But the assassin has been subdued and his memories are being overwritten by Araxis’ last backup. Normal service will resume shortly.

    Long live the immortal Saint Araxis (XII).

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    1. John - you have such a vivid imagination and this is yet another example of it. You've crammed so much description into 100 words and so many story threads. The ominous piece here for me is the orders being sent by an inadvertent slip; thank goodness the commanders queried it.

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    2. Oh, this is beautifully wrought. I love the transmissions from the front line, and the automatic reboot. One wonders if the next assassin ought to be a programmer instead.

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    3. John, you have an incredible ability of streaming us directly into your scenarios and leaving us there, scared. I love this tale of, or the equivalent of, regicide - and how easily the fallen is replaced.

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    4. I'm a bit awestruck at how much you fit into a mere handful of words... brilliantly written.

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  17. John, this must be one of your most impressively effective leaps of imagination - breath-takingly clever, and the 'little wooden ships' such a strong visual. Loved it.

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    1. Wild imagination John, nice visual writing!

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    2. John, this is very cool, as Sandra says, a real leap of imagination.

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  18. I wrote all my comments ... and Blogger flipped and I lost them all... so ... once more into the battlefield...
    Phil, this first date is sooooo cold and sooo gory and soooo good!
    John, startling imagery and brilliant use of the words.
    Sandra, love the ongoing saga
    Shaun, loving the ongoing saga, Uttoxeter is turning out to be one hell of a hero
    Nick, Charon's POV, unusual and very chilling
    Dex, welcome, good to see you here, love this, that last line is so evocative.
    Wish there was a SAVE button somewhere...
    Been flat out this week working on the six new anthologies I am doing for Static Movement. I have a stash of 'accepted but not used' stories from my stable of writers, knowing the anthologies are good to go, I have been setting up folders and allocating the stories, the whole preparation bit. Time has escaped me and I am not finding the words inspiring me, yet. Time to call on my resident spirit author for some help. Rich, where are you??????

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    1. Wow, that's some going with all those anthology pieces to manage. Glad that Rich was able to fire up your imagination for our enjoyment :-)

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  19. Rich obliged, said it was best offers at such short notice...
    Greeting The Visitor

    Saint? No way. Sinner? In whose eyes, I ask? Which criteria do you use to judge? The blood? My form of decoration. Now listen; you barged in, accept what you find when you enter my world so abruptly.
    Your wife? Ah, is that her identity? Funny, she never mentioned a husband when we met in that pub down the road, the one which runs the weekly quiz, you know it? She was quite knowledgeable, as a couple we won several times.
    I’m sorry to lose her but she got rather too nosy about what I have in my cellar.

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    1. "My form of decoration" was even more chilling than what he might have in his basement.

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    2. Antonia, love the monologue here and the way it slowly reveals the scene for us. Cleverly done and that last line delivers with such impact.

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    3. Antonia, I really enjoyed the clipped country tone to this; rather League of Gentlemen (the bizarro UK TV series - not the American film).

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    4. Very clever monologue, Antonia... sharp delivery...and that last line... had me squirming in my chair, I will tell you!

      Brava!

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  20. How well you evoke that one to one quizzical conversation, without the other saying word!

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    1. I wonder what he did to her? and what he keeps in his cellar?

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    2. Oh Antonia that is so sinister. I am wondering about what he uses for decoration and my imagination is filling his house with horrors.

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  21. Lots of delicious little tales here. Can't stay long, but I will be back to comment. Meanwhile, here is my little token...


    CONTAGION
    By Veronica Marie Lewis-Shaw

    ~~**~~

    “I know I’ve not exactly been a saint, but I’m too young to die.”

    “Denial… so predictable. Trust me, Kenneth… this is happening and….”

    “Really? The great deceiver... I’m supposed to trust you? Please!”

    “There appears to be some confusion. I’m not Satan…”

    “Yes…. I know. You’re Death and we’re on your barge, crossing the River Styx.”

    “Kenneth, do you remember…?”

    “I’m really not in the mood for a quiz.”

    “May I please finish a sentence? That’s very rude.”

    “Oh… somebody’s touchy! Miss your quota, Reaper-man?”

    “You fuck enough corpses, Kenneth… did you not you think you might ‘catch’ something?”


    ~finis~

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    1. Kevin seems to be in for the ride of his life!

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    2. That's telling him like it is!

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    3. cold, calculated and nasty! Just the way it should be! good one, Veronica!

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    4. Good dialogue here Veronica fascinating ideas too.

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    5. There's a meet comeuppance. Or a meat one, I suppose. Kenneth should have gone to Dante's hell instead. They have a whole floor waiting for him.

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    6. Like Antonia, great use of the spoken word to describe the scene. Kenneth is so full of agression but that last sentence lets Death, as always, have the last word. Is it wrong that it made me smirk slightly with the reveal? Always use protection kids!

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    7. Thank you Helen, Sandra, Antonia, Shaun RR and phil!

      I did struggle a bit coming up with a story for this week's words, but once the idea of doing it entirely in dialogue popped in my head, the story took off. So glad you enjoyed.

      Not at all Phil... I smirked a bit too when I wrote that last line!

      Think I could sell this as a public service announcement? Lol!!

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  22. I've made it this week, just in time! Here's my offering.

    Timing is Everything

    She was at her usual table in the Toffee Top Café, when he barged in.
    “You look cool, where have you been?” He quizzed her.
    “Nowhere.” Marcy took a drag on her cigarette.
    You did it?”
    “Did what?”
    “Betrayed me.” His fingers latched around the pistol in his pocket.
    “What are you talking about?” She reached into her bag; her hand clasped the knife.
    “Don’t act the Saint.”
    “I won’t .” She threw the knife just as he pulled out the pistol and fired.
    Their eyes met for one last time.

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    1. Great that you could make it this week Helen and I hope that you are feeling better.

      Neat little tale this with tension expertly built throughout. I've got visuals playing through my mind of knives and bullets whistling through the air in slow motion a la The Matrix. Now I want to know whether either of them made it! Great writing.

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    2. WOW!!

      Echoing Phil... SO glad you made it this week, Helen!

      Wondering about this couple's back story... intriguing probably isn't the half of it.

      Very nicely done!

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  23. Congratulations to the winners of Phil's First Friday Predition.

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    1. This is a very neat and tidy - and effective - tale, Helen.

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    2. very sharply defined, Helen! what a relationship these two had! a back story all on its own.

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    3. That was a great read Helen and yes, very neat.

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    4. That's a tight little story. Love that perfect moment at the end.

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  24. Back with more comments later... Here's mine (took a liberty with 'Saint'; hope you don't mind Phil.)
    ______________________

    Testing the Waters

    “Test me.”

    The pair sat at the water’s edge, picking stones and finding no treasure. Kieran squinted in the lazy sunshine. He turned to his older brother.

    “What, like a quiz or summat?”

    Rory stared across the river; his head in some other place.

    “No. Something... dangerous.”

    Kieran couldn’t miss an opportunity to get his older bro in trouble. He scanned the area, spotted it.

    “Over there. That barge – the Santa Maria. Break in and bring back a trophy.”

    ***

    “Yeah sarge, two bodies. Young kid – sixteen, seventeen and an old man. Looks like a fight...

    ... No. No witnesses. Not yet.”

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    1. I wonder what happened?

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    2. I envy the light touch you have with these tales - they suggest so much while saying so little.

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    3. lots going on but nothing being told, we are left to assume.. and in assuming we paint vivid pictures. Clever one, Lily!

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    4. Oh, this begs a hundred questions! I want more, and yet there's something perfect about the infinite possibilities unexplained.

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    5. How could I not forgive you a slight discretion Lily when you give us such a great tale. The strange thing is that it is what you haven't written that makes this work so well by leaving us to fill in the gaps with what little information you've left behind to tease us with. Very, very clever.

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    6. Such a light touch... yet such a dark tale... and a clever tease at that!

      Part of me wants more and part of me wants to fill in the blanks myself... but then, my imagination could not do justice.

      Brava, Lily!

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  25. Another one!

    Lachrymosa

    Sometimes it turns out fine. Sometimes it doesn’t. That was all they said.

    Sarah approached the painted saint, its expression beatific yet quizzical as though wondering what all these people were flocking to her for. The young woman reached up to the alabaster face to “take the tears”, expecting a glycerine nectar but finding instead a light, salty water. She just had time to squint at the corners of the saint’s eyes before the next pilgrim barged through the door for healing.

    No holes.

    Sarah left slowly, wondering if the supplication had worked. A whisper breezed past her ear.

    “Muerte.”

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    1. superb, this one, says everything.

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    2. Gorgeous, simple, profound. You're on your game today.

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    3. Clever, clever, clever. Proof that a little prayer does not absolve us of our sins. Pretty much faultless throughout. So good.

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    4. Pitch perfect!

      This one left me all shivery, Lily... you do know where the 'buttons' are and just how to push them!

      Brilliantly done... worthy of a second 'Brava!'!

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  26. Did you really think she'd leave it all to Gabriel?

    The blacksmith’s wife [part 16]

    Sovereigns! Too many to pass up if they were to come to me, yet how to keep from Gabriel what it would take to gain them? I’d not claim sainthood, yet keep my promises, had once again vowed I’d be virtuous.
    As we galloped I moved back, and felt him quickening. Soft-voiced, quizzing, ‘I knew naught of you ... How came you by the gold?’
    Laughing, he recognised my greedy immorality, returned knife to belt, slowed horse and reached for me. I allowed just a taste of what might be before hard-barging sufficient to unseat him, then riding fast away.

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    1. no, she wouldn't leave it all to Gabriel ... she had to do something and here she is, busy doing something... good continuation here, Sandra.

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    2. Ha! I knew I'd placed my faith in the right one. Good for her.

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    3. So now she has the wrath of both brothers upon her! Eager to see where this tale is going to take us next.

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    4. Sandra, "hard-barging sufficient to unseat him" has made my day. Don't ask. Love how you've taken us into yet more possibilities - what could possibly happen next?

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    5. Clever solution to the problem... apparently one can have their 'cake' and eat it too!

      I think Lily and I are on the same wave-length, Sandra... 'hard-barging sufficient to unseat...' left me... well, some things a lady doesn't talk about. ;-)

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  27. Not quite the future I have planned for Tower Block Lily, but it's been a busy week and I want to throw something into the Pot

    The Mighty Have Fallen - Part 2

    We’d been watching MI5 quiz the youths on the estate all morning. When they figured they had some intelligence, they would barge the door of yet another apartment. Their game of cat and mouse went on all day.
    As dusk settled Saint Raphael woke Lily from her slumber, “It’s time to go,” he whispered softly. As she stirred her eyelids flicked open revealing her eyes, like two plump boiled eggs ripe to burst, her serpent tongue flicked about tasting the air about her. “The mother ship is nigh, it is time for mortals to bow down he is coming home”

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    1. And I'm glad you did William - long may this so well-voiced series last!

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    2. Wow, William this has taken a shocking turn. I like it. ;)

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    3. intriguing, to put it mildly...

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    4. Oh dear. Our inability to bow down seeds a nice conflict.

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    5. This is a little more than 'throwing something into the pot' William. Love the descriptives you've got going on in the piece, especially loving 'like two plump boiled eggs ready to burst'. Great to see this urban fantasy/sci-fi piece building.

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    6. "...time for mortals to bow down..." Oh, now... that just drips with horrific promise!

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  28. What's that, oh my, it's gone 9pm! That's it folks, party's over for this week. Do stay a bit to chat and comment but no more offerings for now; in fact I've got party cake wrapped up in paper napkins, do take some with you (devil's food cake naturally).

    Going to comment on the stories I've missed so far then deliberate on my favourite. Check in tomorrow morning at 9am for the winner and next week's words.

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  29. Aaargh - blogging blogger keeps Page Not Founding on me. Last try - Veronica, Helen, William - num. Enjoyed immensely but am seemingly not allowed to comment all over you. Sorry Phil!

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